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Thursday, December 18, 2014

The End

This is a translation of the book of Revelation by Jesse Steele. The full title is The End: A Bible Translation of John's Revelation. He describes it as "A translation of the Book of Revelation. This translation method uses an unconventional “cliché-for-cliché via word-for-word” method, which also has consideration for word count, syllable count, poetry, and rhyme.

The Learner's Greek New Testament

The Learner's Greek New Testament is a series of volumes designed "to enable a current or even a past student—one 20 years or more out of his final Greek class—to open a Greek NT and translate without difficulty." It is the work of David Harris Walker. Volumes have been published over the past two years. All of the New Testament has been finished except for Matthew, Mark and Luke.

Thanks to JH for notice of this series.

Modern Literal Version

The Modern Literal Version is still being updated. The latest update was September 14, 2014. Downloads are available in word processor and eSword formats. It is also available in print on Amazon. The website bills this translation as:
  • The World's Most Accurate English Bible Translation
  • The Only Open Source English Bible Translation
  • The ONLY error-free translation, (or plans to be)

World Messianic Bible

The World English Bible: Messianic Edition (EELBV #8865) is now known as the World Messianic Bible. It was also previously known as the "Hebrew Names Version." According to the FAQ, this is a revision of the World English Bible with the following changes:
  • God's Proper Name in the Old Testament is rendered "LORD" or "GOD" instead of "Yahweh".
  • Many proper names in the New Testament are given in their Hebrew forms instead of the common Greek/English forms.
  • "Baptize" is rendered "immerse" for a more clear connection between Jewish purification rituals and the meaning of the Greek word.
  • The books of the Old Covenant are listed in the traditional Hebrew Bible order.


Thanks to JH for this notice.

Friday, December 12, 2014

Contemporary King James Version

The Contemporary King James Version is an interesting one. It came out this year, but the paperback is already listed on Amazon as out of print. The Kindle format is still available. On Google Books the creator is listed as Olisa Ufondu. The sample on Barnes and Noble says it (or at least the Foreword) is copyrighted 2012 by Johannes Holseart Ministry. Here is the description from Amazon.com:
The purpose of the Contemporary King James Version (CKJV) is to win Men, Women, Boys, and Girls to the saving knowledge of the Lord Jesus Christ. So why edit the CKJV? For the same reason, the King James Version (KJV) was written: to be in the modern language of the land. (That is why in this First Edition, the 1611 KJV Translators to the Reader is being provided.) So there are no stumbling blocks for souls in reading the Holy Bible. There have been times were this Editor had to explain what a word meant to a reader of the KJV (e.g. wot meaning know). No attempt by this Editor has been made to move commas, semi-colons, colons, etc. Only those words that are no longer a part of the modern dictionary, at the time of Queen Elizabeth the Second’s Diamond Jubilee, 2012, were replaced. All words that are not in the dictionary or not now commonly used in speech, where changed to a modern close equivalent (e.g. thou changed to you). If there was a word that did not have a close equivalent, then this Editor kept the word but bracketed ({}) the meaning of the word next to it (e.g. meteyard with yardstick). A number of times this Editor used the brackets to emphasize the plural or singular of the word be (e.g. 2 Tim. 3:15. If we be {are} ignorant, they will instruct us…) to stay with its current use. Prior to the CKJV, publishers had gotten rid of obsolete letters used in the 1611 KJV (e.g. ƒ with s) or using letters differently than today spelling (e.g. i for j). Sometimes this Editor was surprised to find certain words in the dictionary that I thought would not be there (e.g. hither meaning to this place and thither meaning to that place). So I kept them. You, the Reader, will have to look them up. The result of this endeavour can be demonstrated with the verse from John 12:48:

1611 KJV shows, “He that reiecteth me, and receiueth not my words, hath one that iudgeth him: the word that I have spoken, the same shall iudge him in the last day.”

The current KJV shows, “He that rejecteth me, and receiveth not my words, hath one that judgeth him: the word that I have spoken, the same shall judge him in the last day.”

The CKJV shows, “He that rejects me, and receives not my words, has one that judges him: the word that I have spoken, the same shall judge him in the last day.”




I think JH gets the credit for finding this one too!

Sunday, December 7, 2014

The Classic Orthodox Bible

The Classic Orthodox Bible is the 2014 work of Christos Jonathan Seth Hayward. It is available to read online for free. I had some problems with the online version. Several or most of the Psalms wouldn't display. The Old Testament is said to be Brenton's Septuagint. I haven't discovered yet if any changes were made to that text. While the NT is from the KJV, some changes have been made. For example:
In the beginning was the Mystic Word, and the Mystic Word was with God, and the Mystic Word was God (John 1:1).
The description on Amazon is as follows:
The Classic Orthodox Bible is a complete Bible that includes Sir Lancelot Brenton's translation of the Septuagint (also known as the LXX), the Greek Old Testament as it was known to Christ and many of the earliest Church Fathers. Missing verses and the New Testament are taken from the King James Version, whose style and quality are imitated by Sir Lancelot Brenton. His translation is available in tiny, hard-to-read letters in the margins of Hendrickson's Septuagint, more of a convenience to scholars reading the Greek than devotional use. Readers wishing for a complete English translation of the Septuagint in a regular Bible, and who appreciate the beauty, grandeur, and meticulous word-for-word accuracy of the King James Version will find the Classic Orthodox Bible a delight.

Saturday, December 6, 2014

Clarified King James Bible

The Clarified King James Bible appears to be the work of Hall V. and Joan Worthington. This is a revision of the King James Version. The explanation of the Bible reads:
Of course, we did not start with the 1611 version; we started with the current version, which has the many printing errors already corrected, but with no margin notes and many translation errors remaining. From this current King James Version, the obsolete words have been updated, sentence structure has been modernized, punctuation has been modernized, and meanings have been clarified consulting several other translations, including the original Greek from http://classic.net.bible.org, as well as receiving revelations from the Holy Spirit as to meaning.

Friday, December 5, 2014

The New Century Gospels of Jesus Christ

The New Century Gospels of Jesus Christ was produced by LivingHour.org, a Thailand based publisher. The page on Smashwords has this description:
This contemporary version of the canonical Gospels (Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John) uses the “Twentieth Century New Testament” as its primary resource. Subsequent edits were made after careful consideration of the King James’ Bible and the current forms of modern English usage. The resulting text brings the story and teachings of Jesus to life for all readers, regardless of their faith.


Thank you to JH for this one.

Bernard Bible

This Bible was sometimes known as the Bernard Bible for whom it was published. A. C. Kendrick and others revised this Bible which was published in 1842. This is #7350 in the Encyclopedia of English Language Bible Versions. It was an early "immersion" version. Up till now, I have not found a copy. But today, I found a copy on the Internet Archive! The title page says "second edition." By the way, the Internet Archive is having a fund raiser to help cover their costs. Why not go download a copy of this Bible and make a donation to help?

The Landmark Edition of the New Testament

The Landmark Edition of the New Testament is a slight revision of the KJV. The Greek "baptizo" is translated "immerse" and "ekklesia" is translated "congregation." Modernized words are provided in brackets such as "anon [soon]." Jim Turner was responsible for the editing of the text. Others from The Lord's Baptist Church in Tacoma, Washington provided notes and editing. This work is available on Amazon, Barnes and Noble, and XLibris. There is also a PDF available here. More information about the development is found on the Tacwash Blog.

The Holy Bible - True Name Version

The Holy Bible - True Name Version appears to be a revision of the King James Version. It was done by Kimberly Fuller in 2011. "Yahweh" is used for "Lord" and "God." For example, in Genesis 2:7 it reads "And Yahweh formed..." In the New Testament it uses "Yeshua" for "Jesus."

Thank you, JH, for finding this version!

Qetura New Testament

The Qetura New Testament was done by Christopher Anderson. It appears it may be a revision of the King James Version. This version uses "Yahshua" for "Jesus" and "Yahweh" for "God." Only a small preview is available on Lulu.com. The description of this work on Lulu.com reads:
The New Testament. Africa has a rich history with the Bible & the Jews. This history & culture is highlighted in this new version. Jesus`s Jewish name(Yahshua) is also used to take the messiah & the New Testament back to its Jewish roots
A description found on Facebook reads as follows:
A New Testament from a biblical African/ Jewish view. Finally our take on it. Started with Jews & Africa. Africa is mentioned in Genesis 2nd chapter, first book of the Bible. Its not a white man religion. Started in east ,not the west. Enjoy


Thanks to JH for this discovery!